click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20091101
20091130
STATION
CSPAN 204
LANGUAGE
English 204
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 204 (some duplicates have been removed)
that show a two-pronged attack on violent crime would be successful in america, producing violent crime by as much as 50% with life sentences for career criminals. for example, under the armed career criminal bill, and we passed the second chance act, the biden specter bill, the president signed it last year. it seems to me that we need more funding on detoxification, job traini training, re-entry. no surprise when a functional illiterate leaves prison without a trade or skill, they go back to a life of crime. i would like you to take a look at that. i would also like you to take a look at the issue on attacks on prison guards. there's been a rash of them because of the very substantial overcrowding. i wrote to the director of the federal bureau of prisons who i know is doing an excellent job with some suggestions about giving the guards some protective measures. some suggestions have been made about pepper spray, some suggestions have been made about break-away batons, stab-proof vests. i would appreciate it fld take a look at those items and others which could provide safeguards for p
>>> tonight an "issues "special presentation. cases that changed america. for the next hour i'll examine high profile trials that for bet are or for worse forever altered america's justice system. from the spectacle of the michael jackson molestation trial, where he was found not guilty on all counts. the media circus outside the courtroom, as bizarre as the twists and turns on the witness stand. i'll analyze how celebrity complicates cases in this 24/7 news culture and whether a different standard of justice applies to stars. >>> to trials that create celebrity. scott peterson killed his pregnant wife but before he was sentenced to death in 2006, he became a pop culture phenomenon. this strange case showed us that a horrific crime in anytown usa can grip the entire nation. >>> plus, we'll look at the most infamous celebrity trial of them all, o.j. simpson's double murder trial. all the evidence pointed to simpson in the double murder of his ex-wife nicole, and her friend ron goldman. but o.j. was amazingly acquitted. the case ushered in the era of legal television, key player
are going to vote on a bill which to me the people of america don't like. and you know who doesn't like it the most? seniors. you know why? they're concerned. they know medicare is being -- is going broke, and by the year 017, there will be $500 billion of cuts in medicare. and yet, the money that's being cut from medicare isn't being used to save medicare. it's to start a whole new program that's going to cause americans who have insurance to pay more. it's going to cause people that don't have any insurance to make it harder to get, or if they go to an emergency room, have to pay more, that bill is going to be higher. all because of what i believe is an irresponsible piece of legislation that is going to be a huge weight on our american economy at a time when you have 10.2% unemployment. but i see the senator from nevada has -- he has a similar copy of the bills next to him and he may want to chime in on what he is seeing in his home state and what he is hearing from people who live in nevada and the small businesses as well as the hospitals and providers. mr. ensign: if the senator w
with chris brown, telling abc's "good morning america" why she took him back and why she decided to leave. >>> hi. i'm mary j. blige. i have the honor of performing at a tribute that recognizes everyday people who change the world. as president of forum, i'm dedicating myself to help women reach their full potential in life. now more than ever, the world needs heroes. i am thrilled to help cnn introduce this year's top 10 honorees. >> how can i turn my back and walk away and leave you right here? i can't. because i know you wouldn't turn your back and leave me. >> nationwide, veterans are neglects, home l unacceptable. >> what branch of service? >> army. >> army. so was i. we are still brothers in arms. so, no man left behind. >> my name is roy foster. my mission is to help and empower homeless veterans. if you're going to work for sobriety, you have to change. we provide service for veterans only, a safe, clean place to live, all the meals and the camaraderie is that internal glue. tell him one of his brothers in arms came out looking for him and let them know we will be back. they are t
are soaking america's rich. good morning. richard bellow one more time. richard? u.s.? caller: -- richard? one more time. richard? you with us? caller: good morning. if there was not one drop of oil in the middle east and the united states did not arm israel in their wars, we never would have suffered 9/11. i do nothing anyone would have heard the name osama bin laden. we are going to be there for years and years. they talk about raising taxes on the ridge to pay for this war. they will be paying for it forever. thank you. host: the first official state dinner will be taking place in washington, "obama was big tent leaves out gop big wigs -- obama's big tent believes that gop big wigs. chief among for those not coming, john maynard -- john boehner and eric cantor. the president did not invite john mccain, even though mr. obama pledged a post-partisan presidency. -- presidency." we will have live coverage of the dinner giving way under -- getting way tonight at 9:00. there is also a press conference that will happen at 11:30 eastern time. the arrival ceremony was originally scheduled for the so
as the true thing is what we're moving towards is a multiracial america. if you look at the composition and the rainbow or the gum ball or the mow sayic of america, -- mosaic of america, the 2010 census that is critically important is going to show an ever-changing picture towards a nation that by the time we get to 2045 or 2050 won't have a majority ethnic group. that is a fundamental reality that that's the course and that's the path that we are on as a nation. so i don't think we -- we have to be concerned. and i think reverend jackson addressed this. about the twisting of the youth -- and several other speakers did -- the twisting of the youth of the -- the twisting of the use of the word race. the way in which people say you're playing the race card. you're raising a racial issue. it's racial injustice and racial disparity that we have to seek to address and to correct. and i think we have an obligation as a nation. because if we don't address it, the past and the future is fraught with even more difficulty. imagine that in 10 short years by 2020 half -- half of the high school gra
have ideologies, but it is america's fate to be an ideology. >> representing that ideology is george washington. >> george washington's statute in the rotunda is a picture of -- is a depiction of george washington out of many depictions of george washington. there are busts of washington. washington is the single most represented person in the art collection. the city is named for him, he picked the site of the building. he laid the cornerstone. he is so connected to it. >> after choosing a site, and then laying the cornerstone in 1793, of it was washington's -- it was washington's desire that it be completely done in 1800. >> washington's vision for this building was something large, magnificent, and would command respect and would make americans of every state love their country better and would be in the affections of all americans. that is his legacy. >> while washington's aspirations for the building and the federal city that it looks out on have been realized, his hopes for what he called a congress house on the banks of the potomac being finished by 1800 would go unfulfilled.
. >> if somebody murders americans and they murder americans in america, they ought to be prosecuted in america and hopefully convicted in america. >> republicans say a civilian trial will also give the alleged terrorists the public platform they want. >>> brand new details on the alleg allege ft. hood shotter. he's saying he did not pressure to hurt americans. the cleric could tell he was becoming uncomfortable in the u.s. military. the cleric told the "post" reporter hasan's killing spree is allowed under islam because it a form of jihad, and because the united states started the battle in muslim countries. has sn accused of shooting and killing 13 people at ft. hood. s he is still in the hospital. >>> and president obama is in china. china financed massive sums of u.s. debt. part of the president's talks may include assurances those investments are safe. the president held a town hall meeting with college students in shanghai where he push for greater freedoming in china. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation, but we also don't believe that the principles t
on the importance of philanthropy. later, america's future and the place in the world. at 8:00, the first of three nights of the c-span's original documentaries on the iconic homes of the three branches of the government, starting with the supreme court. >> tomorrow, dawn kpeck ofi an update on the commercial and real-estate markets. then, author of the walmart effect with charles fishman. after that,sidney hart. "washington journal", live on friday, 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. friday, parliament opens its chambers as the youth parliament debates in the house of commons. also, jayson blair on why he fabricated and plagiarized news stories. also, have world the threat's been over height? sunday, two programs on democracy and the internet, including the university of virginia panel. facebook founder chris hughes on how social networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> thanksgiving weekend on c- span, american icons, three nights of original documentaries on the icon mccombs of the three branches of the american government, beginning tonight at 8:00 p.m. ea
in restrain themselves to do more than their duty. capitalism has worked well in america, and we should be thankful. it has only worked well because we have the government guided by a constitution that proscribes legitimate, necessary limits. in so far as government obeys those limits, capitalism will survive. and we will prosper. i find america to be a nation by a large among nations in the world not much in need of prayer. we are prosperous, we're happy, we're living, we are gentle, we are kind. we have risked our own peace to defend the freedoms of others. we are a good mission. here is my prayer for america. i pray that america should have a government that is smart enough to know the goodness of its people, in a decent enough to respected. in respect it by restraining itself. [applause] >> think you, mr. majority leader. >> i did not realize i would disagree with dick on the subject of whether american needs prayer. i think this is a moment where america desperately needs prayer. this country is in a real crisis, and we have people suffering like they have not been suffering since
commissioner, and on america and the courts, and look at recent changes in the supreme court. >> american icons, three nights of c-span original documentary on the iconic homes of the three branches of american government continues. tonight at 8:00 p.m., the capitol. american icons, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span. get your own copy of american icons, a 3 disk dtv said. order online at c-span.org /store. >> this week, a discussion with fcc commissioner meredith atwell maker. she discusses net neutrality, media ownership rules, and federal rabin policy. >> meredith atwell maker is the best this week on "the communicators." also here is kim hart to join in the questioning. if we did start with the issue of network neutrality and debt management. reduce the price that chairman genachowski emphasize this as his priority -- were you surprised? >> certainly the president had outlined in his campaign speeches, so we knew this was a priority of the chairman. i think a lot like to start with something we all agree on, which is the fact that we ought to have an open internet and we want to have the free f
of the contract with america and the flat tax. she remained -- he approaches any subjects as internet, a government in general with one statement -- freedom of works. please welcome, dick armey. [applause] >> let me introduce somebody that every time i hear the name, dick armey's ideological soul mate. arianna huffington -- [laughter] is a nationally syndicated columnist and author of 12 books. she is co-host of "left, right and center," in may, 2005, she launched a news again blog site that has quickly become not only one of the most widely read and the most influential in the media and in political circles. in 2006, time magazine put her on the list of the time 100, their list of the world's most influential leaders. in 2009, she was named one of the most influential women and media by forbes. cordially from greece, huffington moved to england and graduated from cambridge with a master's in economics. she is known for her bold and fearlessness and believes in saying what needs to be said in doing what needs to be done, to leave and succeed. she is a prolific author with titles inclu
's look at the democratic primary voters. they are not the heartbeat of america. political parties -- they have certain beliefs. they are allowed to have beliefs. we have a large chunk of middle america -- they are not the same. the people who serve in the house and senate have ideology. we have resolution among these differences. but with 40 votes in the senate, 177 in the house, those people who have survived are not -- they are the people who feel most strongly about the size of government and we are not going to vote for these bills. olympia snowe is a good example. she has a great feeling about the center in maine. we have seen this since 1978. this number, this is 176. the republican vote came after 2018. he was with the leadership because he would not be there for 218. the public auction is the same thing that means that this is too much government health care. this is not acceptable for what we think should happen. mitt romney passed a mandate, and it said, you do not need this for public out -- for a public auction -- public option. >> is it possible for a president to hav
it is all about you. that is something that i do not think it works well. >> home to america's highest court. the role is to interpret the constitution of the united states. outside, almost daily expressions of protest are made by those of listing the courts except their case or role in their favor. there are private rooms seen by those that are there. it is the justices appointed for life terms that have always defined this very human institution and the buildings in which they do their work. >> i think it is the previous building in washington. it is distinctive. is a different type of marble. it is lighter and brighter. immediately, i do appreciate it. it represents a different branch of government. it really is monumental. it represents the lincoln memorial in terms of the visual impact. if you view it as a temple of justice, i think that is entirely appropriate. >> 21st come up to the steps -- when you first come up to the steps, there are too candelabras. -- two candelabras holding the scales of justice. on the of the side are the three faces. is it symbolic indication. as he traveled
one of the unique advantages that america has which is the fact that we are able to develop capital and credit in a way that allows people who want to go out and take risks and create jobs to get that capital and credit. that's something that no other nation has yet been able to replicate at the levels that we have been able to do it as a nation. and we have to be careful that responding to a dries sis which had a lot of underlying causes, that we don't fundamentally harm that unique advantage that america has. and so i guess that's how i come at this. so let's look at the causes that cause this crisis. we were all there on the front line when it collapsed on us. primarily it was real estate. it was a real estate bubble. now, i've been through three of these in my professional experien experience, once as a bank attorney for a small bank in new hampshire, once as governor of new hampshire when five of my seven largest banks failed and this time. in p every instance a real estate bubble is a function of the fact that there's a disconnect between underwriting and responsibility. loans
as a public service by america's cable companies. coming up this thanksgiving day, director steven spielberg received the liberty medal at the national constitution center. then, remarks from the former undersecretary of defense, paul wolfowitz on the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. after that, political strategists assess the new obama administration as he nears his first year in office. friday, for the first time in british history, parliament opens its chambers to non-mp's as they debate in the house of commons. former new york times reporter at what has to his plagiarism. a look back to the cuban missile crisis, as well. also, have world threats been over-the post cold war world. sunday, two programs on democracy and the internet, including the university of virginia powell on how the political process has been affected by the internet. the facebook founder will talk about how networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> thanksgiving week and on c- span, american icons, three nights of cspan original documentaries on the iconic homes o
as a result of the contributions of the european union, america and some of the richest countries of the world. we will do everything in our power to secure a climate change agreement in copenhagen. >> thank you, mr. speaker. whatever are the individual speakers on afghanistan there's clarity on the mission. the prime minister has said we're in afghanistan to protect british people against terrorism. and yet almost in the same breath threatens to pull out of the country if president karzai can't clean up his corrupt government. these are contradictory messages they are sending out mixed signals. can the prime minister now square that circle?vu >> we are in the country because of the threat to britain. a threat that has been seen over eight years as a result of projected and actual terrorist defenses in our country. three-quarters of which come from afghanistan and pakistan and mainly the borders of pakistan. that is why we are there to protect the streets of britain. i was right to ask president karzai to give us assurances about how in his second term he would tackle corruption. he has now an
in the middle of 18 acres known as the president's part, the white house has been home to each of america's chief executives since john adams, with west and east wings added. it has undergone many changes, but the courthouse still remains a place of them recognized. divided into public and private sections, its ground and first floors are open for tours. above that or the private quarters of the family. inside the central mansion, there are 132 rooms, with a floor plan that unites the ground, state, and second floor with a centrally located oval shaped room. on the ground floor in the central space is the diplomatic reception room, with the map room, library, and china rooms complementing it on either side. one floor up is the state floor, anchored by the blue room in the center, with the state dining room at 1 did the hall, the east room at the other, and the red and green rooms of to either side of the blue state parlor. on the second-floor private residence, the yellow oval room is the central space, ordered by the treaty room, lincoln bedroom, and the queen's room to the east of it. p
approach should use? caller: he should not make america look weak, which is what he is doing. host: baltimore, up next. we are asking about the president's foreign policy. subtle and strategic or weak and naive? caller: i think he is subtle and strategic. i am concerned about the earlier caller said -- and said that force is the american way. that is horrible. we should be able to compromise, talk with each other, and except differences. -- accept differences. for americans to be that forceful, i am more scared of them then i am of what others can do to us. host: when you say that we should be trying to talk, talk about the president's speech that he is making on tuesday. what are you expecting to hear from the speech and how does that apply? caller: i do not want him to go to war. unfortunately that is a big part of life sometimes. you have to use of force. i think it he has discussed this for awhile with us. the previous administration has gone in without talking. if i know that i have to use force sometimes, it can be necessary, but i think that the way that the president did it
general motors and chrysler? governments don't own big companies in america. what ruptured? what ruptured is the concern that there is way too much in spending and to be fair, it's not the president's fault. but when you say -- and the combined the billions of dollars, there is one huge massive spending and as a stimulus package. . >> what happens is the republican party has a lot of troubles. we put on the brakes and send a missile. that was to park. -- that was too far. many private people said there will be a bill and we're better off negotiating in good faith because there is going to be a bill. what is going to happen is this possibility, which is the a.m .a is there because they thought they would get a deal. if it does not get fixed, i do not know where they will be. hospitals are there because they said they would have 9066%6% coverage. >> why do you think the industry support did not translate into republicans support? >> we're down to 170 boats. at 177 votes, the sport gentleman in new orleans. ok, we could lose that seat. at 177 seats, there are not a lot of seats you can lose.
night at 8:00 eastern, the supreme court, home to america's highest court, reveals the building in ex quiz it detail through the eyes of supreme court justices. friday at 8:00 p.m. eastern -- our visit shows the grand public places as well as those rarely-seen spaces. and saturday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, the capitol. the history, art and architecture of one of america's most symbolic structures. american icons, three memorable nights, thursday, friday and saturday at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. get your own copy of american icons. a d.v.d. set. order online at c-span.org/store. >> regulating the internet. one of the topics monday with meredith atwell baker, the newest f.c.c. commissioner. the communicates on c-span 2. >> president barack obama hosted his first state dinner last night. the event honoring the india's prime minister was set in a tent on the east lawn. he hosted indian prime minister manmohan singh. here's a look. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states and mrs. michelle obama, accompanied by his ex lensy, the prime minister of the mrs. kahr. [hail to t
, and for the millions who have no coverage whatsoever, this is a critical moment. this is the united states of america and there are certain things that you should have a right to. one thing is certain. you should have a right to decent health care, to be able to see a doctor when you need it. that is what we are attempting to do with this bill. that is what we have done for the very first time in the history of our country, to have a health care plan that will serve all the people of our nation. nothing less than that is our objective. we have begun that journey. i am as confident that as i stand before you with our leader, that we are going to accomplish that goal. before this journey is over, we will have passed national health care coverage for all americans. >> i cannot think of a better vote to have right before thanksgiving i think the american people, when they learn what is in this bill, will be very thankful that we are moving ahead. make no mistake about it. this is a momentous vote that we just had tonight. it is a pivotal vote. as we now move ahead in the debate and the amending process,
in the middle of 18 acres known as the president's park, the white house has been home to each of america's chief executives since john adams, with west and east wings added. it has undergone many changes, but the courthouse still remains a place of them recognized. divided into public and private sections, its ground and first floors are open for tours. above that are the private quarters of the family. inside the central mansion, there are 132 rooms, with a floor plan that unites the ground, state, and second floor with a centrally located oval shaped room. on the ground floor in the central space is the diplomatic reception room, with the map room, library, and china rooms complementing it on either side. one floor up is the state floor, anchored by the blue room in the center, with the state dining room at 1 did the hall, the east room at the other, and the red and green rooms of to either side of the blue state parlor. on the second-floor private residence, the yellow oval room is the central space, ordered by the treaty room, lincoln bedroom, and the queen's room to the east of it.
, there are parts of the country that do not, particularly in rural america, if you want to sign of for broadband, there are literally no options at all. that is about 10% of the country, and that is an issue that we will be trying to address as part of this plan. second, there is an adoption challenge. in the bulk of the country that does have access to broadband, the percentage of americans that do not use it is too high. generally across the country, it is about 40% of americans who do not use broadband, do not sign up for broadband, and more troubling, and in certain communities the percentage is closer to 60% or 65%. among low-income americans, among elderly, in rural america, among our seniors, and that is a real challenge. the costs of not being on our broadband infrastructure are growing in our digital economy. the third thing they asked us to look at is making sure we have a strategy so that broadband helps us succeed on a whole series of national priorities that are important to our country. education, health care, energy, public safety, and each of these, making sure we have the right
plan in america. as one of the old members of the senate on both of the committees of healthcare jurisdiction i understand the complexities at work in comprehensive healthcare legislation. and i understand that this bill gets it wrong. instead of taking a step-by-step approach identifying consensus reforms to fix what is broken and leave what works, the majority leader has chosen a different approach. without republican support and without the approval of a growing majority of american people, senator reid has chosen to shake nearly 20% of the at its foundation in attempting to jam through a strictly partisan bill. partisan bill. this bill will do nothing to improve the quality of our care. it will increase our nation's debt and deficit and it will harm our nation's tenuous job market. mr. president, there is no credible study and there will be no serious unbiased economist who will say that this bill will create jobs or strengthen our economy. and that's what the people in the recent election said was the most important thing to take care of. recently in an op-ed in the "wall st
p panoply of the u.s. law. now they're going to be given a forum to make america seem bad again. criticize and mock america. it's extremely unseemly. >> it may turn out to be an opportunity for some people to get some of the justice they've been looking for for a long time. and they show that the civilian court system can succeed in certain case where is the evidence is clear, it's overwhelming, and you don't need to use all of this secret evidence or evidence that's been obtained through the torture program of the bush administration. >> families of 9/11 victims as you can imagine have some powerful feelings about holding this trial in new york. susan candiotti reports, some people say it hits too close to home. >> reporter: eight years of waiting is eight years too long for jim riches. he wants the alleged 9/11 conspirators tried in new york. the attack killed his son, a fellow firefighter. >> i want to get this moving, justice delay suicide justice denied. >> reporter: a handful of civilians got a close-up look attica lead sheik mohammed and others in a guantanamo courtroom l
on c-span, the look on politics in america from the bipartisan policy center. what is there in politics, the role of the media, and assessing the obama presidency. tuesday night, the first state dinner, as president obama welcomes indian prime minister manmohan singh. and american icons, three nights of c-span documentary's, beginning with "the supreme court" on thursday night. >> now to a conference held by the american council on renewable energy. speakers include jeff bingaman and carol browner. this is about an hour and 40 minutes. on renewable energy. it is 1 hour 10 minutes. >> good morning. good morning, everyone. welcome to the ai8th , yes it is the eighth. we are at the eight global energy in america of national policy conference, the sixth time in this room. what an honor it is to hold this annual review and think about where we are going in renewable energy in america. thank you for coming and i hope you enjoyed this day. believe it or not, that is a symbol of the danish embassy, the embassy of denmark, where we will have a reception this evening. it is a great place to go fr
in the biography, right? right. hilary rosen was in the recording industry association of america. she is also a member of rock the vote. ted devine, i saw him on the moon walk this morning. he was getting done its on jackson square. i think you have 17 winning democratic campaigns. you worked for kerry and gorda. -- gore. we have kiki mclean. president callan nasa may -- president how one asked mcowen t influence do they have on what the candidates will say or are you just a hired gun who is not there to provide the device? -- provide the advice? >> the fact is that sometimes we work for candidates. i think we believe in all of the candidates, even if they are people we just met and have not known long time before we work for them. but, in some cases, we do work with somebody we have known for many years. in which case, we may have influence on them. there are a lot of public policy issues that are not clear, black and white issues. there are grey areas. and a lot of people, even if they have a strong set up and suppose, have to think about it or analyze it, discuss it, and determine where to
the dust settles and the provisions of this bill becomes clear, america will be proud of it as well. this landmark reform legislation includes state basic changes creating a fair, open, competitive marketplace for affordable health coverage. it includes an amendment i proposed for long overdue consumer protections, for emergency services without having to call your health care provider and get a prior authorization. it requires insurance plans to provide behavioral health treatments, such as those children who face the challenges of autism as part of the minimum benefit standard. it encourages investments in new therapy to prevent, diagnose, and treat acute and chronic disease. a tax credit for innovative biotolg research. it ensures that -- for the availablity of child-only insurance coverage in the exchanges. it tops insurance companies -- stops insurance companies from denying coverage for some preexisting condition or gender. it ends the medical benefits shell game. mr. president, as soon as this passes ant president signs it into law, 1.3 million seniors in new jersey will rece
of america's most beloved celebr y celebriti celebrities. >> he would sit on me. >> secrets we would never believe unless we heard it from their own mouths. >> i started waking up in my father's hotel room. >> shocking and heart breaking. >> my mother would say no, joe, you're going to kill him! >> whitney houston stunned america when she confessed about her devastating drug use with now ex-husband, bobby brown. >> you were free casing cocaine. >> yeah. >> your drug of choice was weed with cocaine. >> rock cocaine. >> she dropped bombshells about her with bobby brown and how abusive their relationship was. >> eyes were looking at us. >> secrets don't get much darker than mackenzie phillips's revelations to larry king about her incestuous relationship with her father, john phillips. >> all i remember is arriving in the room, getting high and during a blackout when you are not in your body, you come to and i was in the act of having sex with my father. >> mackenzie's book high on arrival revealed the details of this dark secret she had carried for 31 years. >> we need to talk about how i use
calls in just a minute. let me begin with the president's proclamation. you can find it on america.gov. in it he recognizes-americans who helped colonist to survive their first harsh winter, and acknowledged the troops serving overseas and here. he ends with saying that he set his hair and eye-- you can readn america.gov. there is an editorial about thanksgiving. it is from newsweek. in notes that lincoln declared the annual national observation primarily due to a 15-year head campaicampaign. "the new york daily news" editorial ends with this -- though the date changes from year to year, the purpose does not. give banks to god in whom you believe, for despite our differences and travails, we are truly blessed. a things giving toast here. -- at thanksgiving toast here. we will bring more from the washington times this morning and other editorials. first we want to thank you what you are thankful for this morning. we want to begin with news about afghanistan. sir, let me begin with the front page in their headlined -- the u.s. is seeking 10,000 troops from its allies. let me ask you
. at the president has said, america does not accept the legitimacy of continued israeli settlements. we recognize that the palestinians and other arabs are concerned because israel's moratorium permits the completion of buildings already started, and limits the moratorium to the west bank. they are concerns we share. as to jerusalem, the u.s. policy remains unaffected and unchanged. as has been stated by every previous administration which addressed this issue, the status of jerusalem and all other permanent status' issues must be resolved by the parties through negotiations. the united states also disagrees with some israeli actions in jerusalem affecting palestinians in the areas such as housing, including the continuing pattern of evictions and demolitions of palestinian homes. the u.s. has not accepted and it disagrees with any unilateral action by either party which could have the effect of pre- empting negotiations. as we and others have said many times, the way to move forward is to enter negotiations without preconditions and reach agreements on the two-state solution. a jewish state of i
, unless it rises to the level of the national game. it is a national game. it is america's pastime. it raises to the level of a congressional response. as i said, not in a punitive manner, but in a collaborative manner. in a manner that says, we want the sport to last. we would like there to be more boys playing. and we also have girls football. and we want more people playing and more people lasting. mr. barbour, let me thank you for all that you have given to the people who watch you. do you think the structure of the nfl contracts are contributor to players shielding their symptoms and is there anything to change that culture? >> i will answer that question. come i. ifit comes down to pride. i hated seeing someone else do my job. i think my contracts were not incentivized based on playing time, but for me, it was a sense of pride because i loved doing my job. >> can we balance the pride with ways -- i was going to refer to playing times and incentives -- >> you balance that with education. if you give players the knowledge of their injuries and the potential dangers of their inj
on. the diplomacy and highlighting the best of india and america is what you see in her fashion. and you see this in the menu choice as well. this is a very modern, elegant gown. >> and the white house kept under wraps, until the very minute when she came out to greet the prime minister. >> the white house was very good about keeping everything secret. we heard more about afghanistan that about this. they were very disciplined about keeping best. but that is always the case with what the first lady is going to wear. the east wing is letting us know. >> let's get a look at what the first lady is wearing. they greeted the prime minister and his wife early on this evening. on the front entrance of the white house. [no audio] [no audio] [inaudible] >> present arms! ♪ >> president obama and first lady michelle obama and greeted india's prime minister singh and his wife earlier this evening. festivities are underway. talking what -- talking to us this evening about this. beyond the dress and the coronation, the logistics of the flowers, what type and color of flowers, the linens, th
america today being flown by air line pilots. 70 percent of those are alpa members. we strive every day to deliver safe product. every day on every flight pilots make hundreds of decisions. if those decisions are correct, you don't read about them. you get to your destination and you did not even know. airplanes are mechanical machines. guess what? they break. pilots handle those things. let us talk about when there is an incident or distraction or when pilots make mistakes. what we have developed over the last decade or so are programs called aviation safety action programs. as professionals, what do we do? we don't hide the fact that we made a mistake. we tell our company, which tell the faa -- would tell the authorities and each other so we can identify the mistake. that is the height of being a professional. one who can admit, i'm a human being, and made a mistake, how can i help iran someone else from making that same error. host: laptops, are the tools that could be used in airplanes? there were concerns about the regulations. guest: laptops are being integrated into the cockpit.
weekend. god bless america. host: about 15 more minutes of your calls on who has the bigger influence in washington? constituents or lobbyists? here this headline, the catholic bishops flex their muscles at the opportunities ahead. emboldened by success and inserting restrictive abortion language and to the house healthcare bill, roman catholic bishops said they have found of the model that could provide the latter voice in future policy debates. inside this story, i will turn the page and go little deeper into this story -- they write, churches strategic decisions are significant because with catholics representing 30%, the largest single religious group among members of congress, it can gain access across party lines. while pressuring democratic leaders to adjust to the abortion coverage language earlier this month and the bishops simultaneously contacted republican members and warned them against using procedural tactics to torpedo an amendment. a related story this morning about patrick kennedy. the bishop in rhode island -- this is in "the new york daily news" -- the bishop bent
. >>> on veterans day we salute all troops serving our country and thank america's veterans for that service. >>> some people are asking should women in the military be allowed to go into direct combat? you recall the civilian police officer sergeant kimberly munley, an outstanding officer, the one who rose to the occasion and confronted and shot the ft. hood gunman. she's appearing on "oprah" today. a recent article says the best way to honor her heroism is to drop the ban on women in combat. the article points out there are 10,000 female personnel in iraq. 4,000 in afghanistan. they are driving trucks. treating the wounded. shooting when attacked. more than 100 gave their lives in iraq and another 15 died in afghanistan. the article says the no combat policy pretends women can't take such risks without harming overall military performance. earlier we asked people on one of our cnn tours today their thoughts on this. >> i think the policy is right. women are in many situations that are not physically capable of combat military task. i think women should be allowed. those women with the capa
-coast of "good morning america" is joining us. rumor has it it might be a man joining her. there goes my shot. like i need another shot. all this and more starts right now. >>> i want to begin with the tragedy at ft. hood, texas. ki78d 13, injured 30. he is now talking. what set him sof the subject of a lot of speculation. joining me now to discuss, the founder and executive director of iraq and afghanistan veterans of america. from the american islamic foreign for democracy. first let's go to cnn correspondent on the scene. what is the latest, samantha? give us an update. >> joe, major hasan is awake and apparently talking. and you also know that he was shot four times. he is being treated in a hospital in san antonio, texas. and staff members there tell us that he has been communicating with them, although an official hospital spokesperson would not tell us whether he has been communicating with investigators as well. back here at ft. hood, in an afternoon press conference, lieutenant general robert cohen, the commander, talked about you how he feels in this tragedy, they're moving on to a
pressing in. everything we do is not in the microcosm of america anymore. whether we rise or fall does not just depend on us. host: the professor mentioned about the dubai information. does it affect many people? he kind of suggested it didn't but he said it should be factored in terms of what people think about the economy. caller: yes, dislike for our oil and natural resources, every little ticked i hear about it in china, what happens to us with our resources. i will hear about it affecting china. we did not used to think about that decades ago. host: your global perspective, have you changed your mind about the state of the economy? caller: i just feel a little bit like he did. going with the flow. but when we see where we can really put our muscle to making things better and making the resources last longer, we have to do with and try to bring the rest of the world in with to accomplish that. host: next up, steve on independent line. jacksonville, florida. caller: actually if i change my mind i am a bit more pessimistic than i was. 10.2 percent unemployment and i believe the effec
speaking out about her violent relationship with chris brown telling abc's "good morning america" why she took him back then why she decided to leave. >>> hi. i have the honor of performing at the first cnn "heroes" an all star tribute recognizing every day people who change the world. i'm dedicating myself to help women to reach their full potential in life. now more than ever the world needs heroes. and i am thrilled to help cnn introduce one of this year's top ten honorees. >> how can i turn my back and walk away? i can't. because i know you wouldn't turn your back on me. >> nationwide, veterans are neglected, homeless, unacceptable. what branch of service? >> army. >> so was i. we are still brothers in arms, so no man left behind. my name is roy foster. my mission is to help and empower homeless veterans. if you're going to work for sobriety, you got to change. we provide services for veterans only, a safe, clean place to live, all their meals, mental health services, camaraderie. it is that internal glue. tell him one of his brothers in arms came looking for him and let him know, yea
announced initiative. so that it's not just america. it's america is part of a larger nato coalition, which is going to be supportive of success in afghanistan but because it's important that we do succeed in afghanistan. we can't succeed, i believe, without appear significant number of additional combat forces through the other initiatives that i've talked about. and that's what the president need to do is explain why it is that success is important and how we are part of a larger effort in that regard. >> senator, among the anxious people waiting for a decision aren't just republicans, it's the military families and the soldiers themselves who think there may be a surge and they may be de ploying as early as january. so morale wise there is a negative effect of the long process in making a decision here. and it can't come to any surprise from the obama administration that they were going to face an afghanistan decision at some point. is there a time when a decision has to be made on behalf of the morale of the troops? >> i think the troops are incredible. and the troops want the best stra
batches of american government. beginning thursday night, the supreme court, home to america's highest court, reveals the building in exquisite detail through the eyes of supreme court justices. friday, the white house, inside america's most famous home, be on the velvet ropes. our visit shows the grand public places as well as the rarely seen in saturday, the capital, the history, art and architecture of one of america's most symbolic structures. american icons, remember one night, thursday, friday, saturday, at 8:00 p.m., on c- span. get a three-disc dvd set for $24.95. >> "washington journal" is next on c-span. president obama and the indian prime minister will hold a joint news conference on relations between the two countries. that begins at 11:45 eastern. this afternoon, a conversation on global food shortages. the president of the world bank is scheduled to speak. we will also hear from the executive director of the u.n. world folk program. -- food program. that begins at 9:00, eastern. coming up this hour, the federal government's relation with rural america. after that, the h
who understand what it is all about and the whole gist of the conversation is that america is going to go on continuing to be the preeminent worldç power. perhaps challenged but we are going to keep on doing pretty much the way we have done it. do you suppose that barack ob ç obama, in these five sessions that he has hadi] in the last f weeks over the future policy in afghanistan, has brought in anybody who asks the question, what is it going to cost? and is this accountant willing to pay thoseç costs to maintai this kind of international policy into the foreseeable futu future? >> one more question.ç >> i'm a graduate student of the politics department. my question is similar to the last two and gets back to the theme of the lastç panel whichs strategic lessons learned. i was intrigued by professor zelikow's comments that after 9/11 the lesson learned was decisive actionç was decisivel rewarded and the threat emerges deal with it now and chop off its head now, take care of it before it gets any worse. and while you didn't explicitly say what the lesson was of çç, my
and others were flown to delaware last night for autopsies. >>> all across america, flags are flig at half-staff at government facilities in memory of those who died in the rampage. several communities held candle light vigils. it can be easy behind the numbeo we want to share details. michael peerson wanted to study music. sergeant amy krueger was a high school basketball and softball player. she was one of the best people you could ever meet. and specialist jason hunt was recently married and about to he to iraq for the second time. his sister says hunt wanted to serve other people and live for something greater than himself. she was proud of her brother's bravery. >> you can expect someone who goes in the army, goes to iraq, you are hard rned for the worst. but you certainly never expect him to die at his base. >> i want to say that because it didn't happen overseas or in a combat situation doesn't make him any less a hero. my brother was the kind of person to jump in front of a bullet for somebody. i don't know the details but i know my brother and he was very brave in this situation.
-all seen today on good morning america. >> tonight, whyry anna got back together with chris, then finally walked away. was it wrong for her to speak out just as she's promoting a new album. >>> the tyra banks weight controversy. tyra's remarkable revelations about her big weight loss. wait, isn't this the same tyra telling women accept the way you look and be proud of your body. >> kiss my fat ass! >> tonight the hot debate. is tyra being a hib cat. >>> jessica simpson's outrage over her sister being fired at mel rose place. jessica, could it be ashley is a bad actress? >>> tv's first provocative news show starts right now. >>> hello, i'm a.j. hammer broadcasting tonight and every night from new york city. >> hello, everyone. i'm brooke anderson coming to you with the hollywood version. rihanna's tearful tell-all. >> i want you to forget everything since she was beaten by chris bowden and what heiss been going through. what we're going to show you will startle you. we've now since her first interview since that terrible night. rihanna holding nothing back and her pain and raw emotions and
. >> this is "america and the courts." next, a panel of supreme court scholars talk about recent changes to the high court, including the retirement of justice souter and the addition of justice sotomayor. the institute of associates program hosted this discussion earlier this month in washington d.c. this is an hour portion of the event. >> i had a discussion with justice o'connor, went on and on about how he was universally loved by all of them. he was a great storyteller, with a great set of tales about life in new hampshire. too many out there, you think of him as a recluse. he had a reputation, he did not socialize much in washington. he would eat by himself, his apple and yogurt. but he had a good relationship with colleagues and was quite active on the bench, quite forceful. he was not at all is quiet, shy retiree as you might think of him socially. the colleagues i talked to recently were on the daily basis of his absence. >> to me, he asked incredibly insightful crash since the questions. you could have a conversation with him based on the substance of what he said, but not because he was a
>>> barack obama making the first presidential trip to asia. he says america needs to improve alliances there. you'll hear how he thinks that will affect you. >>> he had a heart attack after a marathon and technically died. well now, he's alive to talk about it. hear what doctors did to revive him after 40 minutes. >> five, four, three, two, one. >> set an emotional record-setting domino effect. wait until you hear how many tiles they set up for their shining moment. >>> hey, there. thanks for having us over. this is hln "news and views," this is virginia cha. president obama is now in singapore. he will meet with leaders of apec. before leaving japan, he said the u.s. needs to work closer with japan. he also said there are other tough things to deal with. >> this is a place where the risk of a nuclear arms race threatens the security of the wider world, and where extremists who defile a great religion plan attacks on both of our continents. there can be no solution to our energy security and our climate challenge without the rising powers and developing nations of the asia pa
players out across america in these schools and addressing the questions of manhood, and how do you be in essence a manned-up man, but also a compassionate caring person that does not take up the gun. all of our young people admire you, and i wanted to pay tribute for jim brown and thank him. i am going to ask a very quick question to mr. goodell. would you work with us to implement a program that i would like to start with the d.o.j. and others on this question of violence among our young people? >> congresswoman, yes, we would. as i said earlier in the testimony, we believe we set the standard on the nfl level, that our players do on and off the field. i have spoken to mr. brown about the work he is doing, and i encourage it. and i would welcome the opportunity. >> the full disclosure, and this separates from the questioning, this would be different from what you traditionally do. mr. smith, would we be able to work with you on this issue? >> absolutely. i am always happy to work with the attorney general and with you as we have done in the past. we have challenged our players to
to make america better! i want to make america better! i want peace in the world! i want to make america better! i want to make america better! [applause] [applause] >> can i ask all of the members of the congressional black caucus to come forward in a special tribute to reverend jackson? with the like to make this presentation before he speaks. -- we would like to make this presentation before he speaks. reverend jackson, so many of us here in congress are part of that and still are part of a coalition. he paved the way for some many of us to be where we are and who we are as members of congress. we just say thank you today. " we encourage you to fight the good fight and keep hope alive. you certainly have kept us inspired by your life's work. on behalf of the congressional black caucus, we would like to present to you a small token of appreciation from the 42 members of the congressional black caucus. we like to thank you for persevering so many years. 25 years. thank you and god bless you. >> that my exit but -- let me express my thanks to you for how much you were and are and will be
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 204 (some duplicates have been removed)